Inanga is My Redeemer and Office, Says Deo Munyakazi

Deo Munyakazi

Rwanda’s genius Inanga (traditional music instrument) player Deo Munyakazi reveals that playing Inanga changed his life completely – a reason he calls it a saviour, and proudly moves around the world with it despite being made locally from woods.

Some of today’s youth perceive traditional made products like Inanga to be outdated. But for Munyakazi, Inanga made him travel the world and even realize his dreams earlier than he anticipated.

Munyakazi started playing Inanga at a tender age in his remote village in Gakenke district and couldn’t believe, the locally made instrument could make him board a plane to Europe.

Appearing at KT Radio’s evening program Dunda, Munyakazi urged fellow youth to embrace traditional music and shouldn’t be shy to use locally made products.

“Am not shy moving with my wooden Inanga and it has made me travel the world, share stages with stars and even realize my dreams earlier than I had planned, that’s why I call it my saviour and office,” said Munyakazi.

Munyakazi came onto music scene in 2012 and 3 years down on the road, he emerged as the youngest and best inanga player in Rwanda.

His ability to mix Rwandan blues with other genres quickly introduced him to big stages, big festivals in Europe and also earned him a collabo with Britain Grammy award winner Joss Stone.

Through his music journey in Europe, the 27-year-old star has shared a stage with legends like Rwandan traditional music guardian Cecile Kayirebwa, the blue funk creator Keziah Jones, jazz guitarist Tito Al Uribe and Belgian pianist Jeff Neve. Others include French Saxophonist Guillaume Perret and Kenyan Nyatiti player Makadem.

The youngest Inanga star has more than 11 songs under his touch and is proud of his genre.

Some of his songs include Ihorere Rwanda, Ndi amahoro, Izabikora and Rwanda featuring English Grammy award winner Joss Stone.




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