North America to Host 2026 World Cup As FIFA Boss Infantino Begins Re-election Bid

FIFA President Gianni Infantino, right, welcomes representatives of the united bid — from the U.S., Canada, and Mexico — as soccer’s governing body selects its host for the 2026 FIFA World Cup during the 68th FIFA Congress in Moscow, Russia.

The 68th FIFA Congress which convened in Moscow, Russia on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 voted the United Bid as hosts of the 2026 FIFA World Cup Final Competition.

Canada, United States and Mexico were awarded the 2026 FIFA World Cup after the United bid defeated Morocco by 134 votes to 65.

An optimistic promise of delivering $14 billion in revenue helped sway voters, along with the lack of major construction work required on the 16 planned stadiums, all of which already exist.

By contrast, Morocco appeared too hazardous as a potential host when all 14 venues had to be built or renovated as part of a $16 billion investment in new infrastructure. The vote leaves Morocco reeling from a fifth failure in a World Cup hosting vote, with the continent’s sole tournament coming in 2010 in South Africa.

While Morocco’s combined tickets and hospitality revenue would be $1.07 billion, according to FIFA analysis, North America would generate $2 billion additional income.

Canada will host men’s World Cup matches for the first time, while Mexico gets its first taste of the event since staging the entire event in 1986.

The 2026 tournament will be the second to be hosted across more than one country, following South Korea and Japan’s co-hosting of the 2002 edition.

This is the fifth time that Morocco have bid to host the World Cup, and they have fallen short on each occasion.

 On the eve of the opening game of the 2018 FIFA World Cup, the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin made an appearance at the Expocentre and delivered a speech to the representatives of FIFA’s member associations reiterating the country’s readiness to welcome the world.

 Financial results and budget for 2019-2022 approved

The 68th FIFA Congress, among other decisions, ratified the 2017 Financial Report and approved the budget for the 2019-2022 cycle, with an unwavering focus on football development.

After having been presented with updated financial results which show that FIFA has currently contracted more than USD 6.1 billion in revenues – or 108 per cent of its full-cycle budget for 2015-2018 – the FIFA Congress approved the budget for the 2019-2022 cycle, which assumes a growth in revenue to USD 6.56 billion.

Of this number, 70 per cent is already contracted. The budget for expenses is USD 6.46 billion, of which 80 per cent will be invested in football activities.

Michigan stadium which seats 107,601 people. US-Mexico-Canada bid has won over Morocco’s

The budget for the FIFA Forward Programme will be increased by USD 667 million to a total of USD 1.746 billion. As a result, the investment in development & education increases by 41 per cent compared to the current cycle.

Each national Football Association (FA) will receive $6 million ($4.5 million/€5.1 million) for investment in football projects.

In a related development, FIFA President Gianni Infantino announced his interest to stand for the FIFA Presidency during his closing remarks on Wednesday.

The 69th FIFA Congress, scheduled for June 5, 2019, in Paris, on the eve of the opening match of the FIFA Women’s World Cup, will elect the new FIFA President.

The Swiss lawyer was elected in February 2016, just nine months after a joint American and Swiss investigation unfolded into numerous allegations of bribery and corruption surrounding senior FIFA officials.




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